eighty°- the culture of tea 9

475 points to the loyalty system
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19 €

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GT0874

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This issue's topics include yellow tea, writer and photographer Craig Mod traveling in Japan, technical terms Fermentation and Oxidation, Czech ceramics, the Japanese town of Onomichi, artist Morel Doucet, and the traditional Japanese senchadō ceremony. More

In this issue, we delve into the world of the rarest and most unfamiliar of Chinese teas — yellow tea. We explore its history, characteristics, and the regions in which it is grown.

Craig Mod, a writer and photographer who walks across Japan from the largest megacity in the world to desolate small towns and pristine wilderness, shares his experiences of this journey and how it helped him regain his attention and reconnect with the world around him.

‘Fermentation’ and ‘oxidation’ are some of the most common terms thrown around by tea experts as well as enthusiasts. We investigate these terms, debunk myths, and clarify their significance in the tea-making process.

We meet potters who have dedicated decades to perfecting their craft and creating ceramics of international fame. We explore their techniques, inspiration, and the cultural significance of pottery in the Czech Republic.

Despite the population drain from the countryside to big cities in Japan, young generations are setting up new micro-businesses in unlikely places and thus bring forgotten areas back to life. We explore the town of Onomichi with the help of a passionate tea farmer.

We interview Morel Doucet, an artist who shares his views on his Haitian identity and how it influences his work, the significance of tea to his ancestors, and how he thinks art should be perceived.  

We attend a traditional Japanese senchadō ceremony, discuss the post-pandemic issues of the Asian diaspora in NYC and their impact on the community, and talk with a strong-willed teahouse owner in Washington DC, who shares her journey and the challenges she faced in a competitive market.

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Language English